Programming Idea [Academic Library, Passive Program]: Citizen Science

I took a wide range of courses as I was completing my MLIS degree. My favorite class by far was a “Special Topics” seminar entitled “Citizen Science.” The professor, Brian Beaton (now at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo), looks at how people interact with technology, and the social impacts thereof. I loved this class!

Citizen science is using the collective brainpower/computing power of regular people to gather scientific information, in all fields of science – crowdsourced science, if you will. There are all kinds of projects to which people can contribute, which taking varying levels of time and skill on the part of the “citizen.”

With the upcoming eclipse, NASA has requested help with their data collection, bringing citizen science into the spotlight. I’m definitely going to participate in this event, as the eclipse passes right over where I live, and I think it could make a cool addition to the eclipse programs that many libraries across the country are running.

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Reader’s Advisory: Documentaries Worth Watching [PEOPLE]

Documentaries are one of my favorite kinds of films to watch! This is a non-exhaustive list of docs recommended by myself and some of my fellow librarians. My personal faves will be marked with a *.

Reader’s Advisory: Documentaries Worth Watching [PLACES/HISTORY]

Documentaries are one of my favorite kinds of films to watch! This is a non-exhaustive list of docs recommended by myself and some of my fellow librarians. My personal faves will be marked with a *.

Programming Idea [TECHNOLOGY]: Online Self Defense

The Lebanon (New Hampshire) Public Library has been offering a series of classes on personal digital security. Considering how many patrons I’ve helped over the years that “didn’t have a password” or used “1234” or “password” (which always cracks me up, but still!), I think these classes are a GENIUS idea.

The classes have five levels of expertise, beginning with White Belt (avoiding malware and phishing schemes, choosing better passwords, and installing anti-virus software), and going up to Black Belt (high-level online identity protection and Tor encryption protocols).

This is an extremely well prepared curriculum, which can be used for all ages from teens to seniors. I think it would be best for those patrons who are not “digital natives,” but I think everyone can use refreshers on security actions about which we may have become lazy.

Lebanon Public Library’s Online Self Defense Courses

Article of Interest: “These Maps Reveal the Hidden Structures of ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ Books”

Via Atlas Obscura:

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[[Tattoo of Death, Choose Your Own Adventure #22, as mapped out by Chooseco]]

In celebration of Children’s Literature Week, Atlas Obscura takes a closer look at ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ books. I have to admit, I loved these as a child – and I always wanted to figure out how they were designed and how many endings were possible. After reading this article, it became clear to me that these mini-novels were far more intricate than I ever imagined! The visualizations of the paths and decision points are rather beautiful. Tattoo of Death, as shown in the above image, is rather simple in comparison to some of the other stories, but fascinating nonetheless.

Programming Idea [CRAFTS]: The Kindness Rocks Project

Painting rocks isn’t anything new as a craft, but I really like the idea of The Kindness Rocks Project. Rocks are painted with inspirational, encouraging, or just fun messages and images, and then hidden (mostly in plain sight) around your town or library for people to find. I think it could make an excellent passive program for patrons of all ages, and doesn’t require a lot of expensive materials – just rocks, acrylic paints, and paintbrushes.

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Reader’s Advisory: Documentaries Worth Watching [ANIMALS/SCIENCE/NATURE]

Documentaries are one of my favorite kinds of films to watch! This is a non-exhaustive list of docs recommended by myself and some of my fellow librarians. My personal faves will be marked with a *.

Programming Idea [CRAFTS]: Corner Bookmarks

These are so cute! Via Easy Peasy & Fun:

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I love these little monsters! The origami is really straightforward, and they are so easily customizable. The supply costs would be pretty low as well, just multi-colored paper packs, scissors, markers, and glue sticks.

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